Va. Beach plans to use $5.3 million from FEMA for Windsor Woods

Flooding in Windsor Woods following Hurricane Matthew.

VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. (WAVY) — Federal help is slated to be on the way for a Virginia Beach neighborhood decimated by flood waters.

Back in the fall of 2016, Hurricane Matthew caused massive flooding across the area and damaged many homes in Windsor Woods.

This year the city got federal dollars because of the floods, but it wasn’t clear exactly how that money would be spent.

But on Tuesday night, the city is expected to announce that it’ll use the money to speed up a project to prevent flooding in Windsor Woods.

A storage pod on a front lawn in Windsor Woods is an easy reminder of the damage caused by floodwater.

“Every time it rains you kinda get that feeling in your stomach of, ‘could it happen again?’” said Virginia Wasserberg.

Other reminders come as memories to Wasserberg. In October of 2016, she felt helpless as Hurricane Matthew’s rains came down and the water rose to her front door.

“When it got to right here (halfway up her driveway), we realized we had better take some action and take things upstairs that we’d like to protect,” she said.

Eventually the water got inside her home.

“Everything on the bottom floor is damaged, your water heater, your washing machine, dryer, your refrigerator,” she remembered.

But, her story is one of hundreds in the area of homes ruined by Hurricane Matthew.

“Windsor Woods is certainly one of the harder areas hit,” Deputy City Manager Tom Leahy said.

Leahy said this year the city received more than $5 million in FEMA reimbursements. The plan is to use that in Windsor Woods.

“These are three projects we could get going early and relieve some flooding on some streets,”

Each project would install larger storm water pipes in the neighborhood. Those pipes would send floodwater out of the streets faster.

The city expects this project to begin in the next two years.

This is just one of many projects for Windsor Woods. The city already has plans to do more than $120 million worth of upgrades to prevent flooding in the neighborhood.