Crime around Norfolk’s Manson St. moves residents to reach out for help

According to an online crime mapping website, since November 2017 there have been more than 100 various crimes reported in a half-mile radius of Manson Street.

NORFOLK, Va. (WAVY) – Norfolk police are targeting crime in one section of town.

They’re looking into criminal activity on and around Manson Street.

According to police, over a 6 month period of time – from July to December 2017 – officers made 54 arrests in that area.

Police say they have increased patrols – which includes walking the beats and officers on bicycles. The patrols include uniformed officers and plain clothed officers.

“It is dangerous,” Manson Street resident Martha Goodman told 10 On Your Side’s Brandi Cummings on Monday.

The people who live on Norfolk’s Manson Street aren’t proud of what goes on there.

“I’m very concerned about it,” Goodman said.

One neighbor went to city council hoping to curb the crime.

“I’ve tried to contact you Mayor Alexander and the Chief of Police to speak to you personally,” Vanessa Fields said during the July 9 meeting.

Fields explained what she sees outside her door.

“Illegally smoking in broad daylight, dealing drugs in front of you. You can look out of your window and look at this. Urinating and cursing in public,” she said.

In 2015, WAVY reported a man was killed on Manson Street.

10 On Your Side did some digging. According to an online crime mapping website, since November 2017 there have been more than 100 various crimes reported in a half-mile radius of Manson Street — which sits close to the Chesapeake city line.

“I like the neighborhood, but I can’t live where there is no safety,” Goodman said.

Fields and Goodman both think their street has been forgotten.

“I think they should start listening to us and realize that we are here. This is our home and that we matter,” Goodman said.

Bullet holes are riddled across the front of the home Goodman has rented for more than a year. She says they were there when she moved in.

During the interview Monday, she said she often hears gunshots.

Goodman has an alarm on her door but wants to see landlords be more hands on in the area. She also wants a neighborhood association.

“I don’t want to be a prisoner in my home,” she said.

Her neighbor told city council that she too is committed to helping come up with a solution.

“Wherever I have to go, whoever I have to speak to or see I will do that because I feel that everybody, according to your vision statement, should be entitled to live safe,” Fields told city council.

No one from city staff would talk on camera about this.

When contacted by phone, Angelia Williams Graves, the council member representing the area told Cummings by phone this is a police and neighborhood issue. She also declined to interview.