Federal judge orders Flint and Michigan to deliver water to some residents

In a photo from Jan. 2, 2016, Rabecka Cordell picks up a case of bottled water outside the fire station in Flint, Mich. “We both have lead poisoning,” said Cordell, who learned that two weeks ago from her doctor. She says she has leukemia and her son has learning and speech disabilities. She will not even bathe in Flint water and won’t wash her son in it. (AP Photo/Roger Schneider)
In a photo from Jan. 2, 2016, Rabecka Cordell picks up a case of bottled water outside the fire station in Flint, Mich. “We both have lead poisoning,” said Cordell, who learned that two weeks ago from her doctor. She says she has leukemia and her son has learning and speech disabilities. She will not even bathe in Flint water and won’t wash her son in it. (AP Photo/Roger Schneider)

FLINT, Mich. – Work is underway to replace contaminated service lines to homes affected by elevated levels of lead.

While the city has switched back to using a Detroit water source, it will take time to remove the lead from the system, meaning that many people are still left relying on bottled water.

In response, a Federal judge has decreed that the city and state must deliver water to people who have difficulty getting it.

Judge David Lawson made the ruling yesterday in favor of the American Civil Liberties Union and the Natural Resources Defense Council. Both organizations argued that some residents have been finding it very hard to get to distribution sites for free bottled water.

The government must now deliver bottled water to their homes.

That extra effort is not required if the home’s tap water being properly filtered, or of the resident declines delivery.