Officials: Hurricane Matthew causes estimated $40M in damages to Dare Co.

North Carolina Highway 12 sustained major overwash and flooding as Hurricane Matthew surged through the region from Oct. 8 - 9, 2016. Credit: WAVY/Greg Gadberry
North Carolina Highway 12 sustained major overwash and flooding as Hurricane Matthew surged through the region from Oct. 8 - 9, 2016. Credit: WAVY/Greg Gadberry

DARE COUNTY, N.C. (WAVY) — Initial estimates from Dare County, North Carolina show Hurricane Matthew caused millions of dollars in damages to the area, according to emergency management officials.

Outer Banks residents have a long cleanup ahead

Matthew tore through northeast North Carolina last weekend, causing widespread impacts from rain as well as from strong storm surge. It left thousands powerless across the region.

North Carolina Highway 12 suffered severe overwash damage in Kitty Hawk when 125 yards of the road collapsed.

Photos: NC 12 overwash from Hurricane Matthew

Dare County officials tweeted Thursday morning that initial damage assessments show Matthew impacted 4,000 properties and caused $40 million. Officials say those initial figures could increase as crews continue assessing the damage.

North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory has confirmed that at least 20 people have died across the state because of Matthew.

Dare County is eligible for federal assistance. Find more information on FEMA programs and apply online here.

Federal assistance now available for Dare, Hyde, Gates counties

The storm has caused numerous road closures due to high standing water in its immediate aftermath. Authorities restricted access in areas around the Outer Banks to residents, tourists, property owners and employees over the last few days. Many of the initial restrictions have since been lifted.

Dominion Virginia Power reported Thursday morning that around 900 customers remained without power — mostly in the Outer Banks. Power is expected to be completely restored by Thursday night.

Private well owners in Dare County who have seen flooding around their well should have water tested. Until testing deems your water safe, officials say you should boil water for at least five minutes before drinking, cooking, making ice or using for bathing.

Infants under six months and pregnant women should not drink boiled water, because it could concentrate harmful nitrates. Drink bottled water instead.

Private well users should contact the Dare County Department of Health & Human Services’ Public Health Division for more information at 252-475-5003 or 252-475-5080.

Find more information about past travel restrictions and debris pick up here.