Prosecutors: Co-pilot treated for suicidal tendencies

Onlookers stop near the crash site just west of 202 where the small plane went down in the rear of a property on Saunders Lane, Sunday, March 29, 2015. The small plane crashed near a southeastern Pennsylvania airport and took the lives of the only two people aboard the aircraft, authorities said. (AP Photo/The Philadelphia Inquirer, Michael Bryant)

MARSEILLE, France (AP) — German prosecutors say the co-pilot of the Germanwings passenger plane that crashed in the French Alps had received treatment for suicidal tendencies.

Duesseldorf prosecutors say that Andreas Lubitz received psychotherapy “with a note about suicidal tendencies” for several years before becoming a pilot.

Prosecutors’ spokesman Ralf Herrenbrueck said Monday that investigators have found no indication of a motive so far as to why Lubitz crashed the plane, nor any sign of a physical illness.

All 150 people on board died in the crash.

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