Hagan seeks to help historically black colleges

FILE - In this April 16, 2014, file photo, Sen. Kay Hagan, D-N.C., listens during an appearance in Durham, N.C. The feisty personalities and anti-establishment fervor that fed tea party insurgencies in recent GOP primaries are largely missing this year, a troubling sign for Democrats who want Republicans to nominate candidates with limited appeal in the fall. In North Carolina’s Senate race, a once-promising clash between an establishment Republican and two harder-right rivals has yet to catch fire. Long-time party activists say they find little awareness, let alone excitement, among conservative voters, even though Hagan is a top Democratic target in November. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)
FILE - In this April 16, 2014, file photo, Sen. Kay Hagan, D-N.C., listens during an appearance in Durham, N.C. The feisty personalities and anti-establishment fervor that fed tea party insurgencies in recent GOP primaries are largely missing this year, a troubling sign for Democrats who want Republicans to nominate candidates with limited appeal in the fall. In North Carolina’s Senate race, a once-promising clash between an establishment Republican and two harder-right rivals has yet to catch fire. Long-time party activists say they find little awareness, let alone excitement, among conservative voters, even though Hagan is a top Democratic target in November. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — U.S. Sen. Kay Hagan is introducing a bill to strengthen the nation’s historically black colleges and universities.

The measure would create a program of competitive grants that would help fund innovative programs addressing the specific needs of students at black colleges.

Hagan envisions one year planning grants to develop innovative programs. There would also be five-year grants to help run the programs. Grant recipients would have to have a 15 percent money match from another source.

The program would give priority to increasing the number of black males getting degrees and efforts to foster partnerships between black colleges and local high schools. It also would emphasize strengthening partnerships between black college and other institutions to support on-campus research.

There are 10 historically black colleges and universities in North Carolina.

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