NYC police head: We won’t quit social media

FILE - In this May 1, 2012, file photo, a police lieutenant swings his baton at Occupy Wall Street activists in New York. This photo is among the many put on Twitter in response to a New York Police Department request for Twitter users to share pictures of themselves posing with police officers. The NYPD sent a tweet on Tuesday, April 22, 2014, saying it might feature the photographs on its Facebook page. The responses soon turned ugly when Occupy Wall Street tweeted a photograph of cops battling protesters with the caption "changing hearts and minds one baton at a time." Similar photos of harsh treatment by the New York City police followed. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)
FILE - In this May 1, 2012, file photo, a police lieutenant swings his baton at Occupy Wall Street activists in New York. This photo is among the many put on Twitter in response to a New York Police Department request for Twitter users to share pictures of themselves posing with police officers. The NYPD sent a tweet on Tuesday, April 22, 2014, saying it might feature the photographs on its Facebook page. The responses soon turned ugly when Occupy Wall Street tweeted a photograph of cops battling protesters with the caption "changing hearts and minds one baton at a time." Similar photos of harsh treatment by the New York City police followed. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

NEW YORK (AP) — The head of the New York Police Department admits he was caught off guard by the harsh response to a harmless attempt at community outreach on Twitter.

But Commissioner William Bratton says he has no plans to abandon social media.

Bratton made the remarks on Wednesday after online pranksters, known as trolls, posted hundreds of recycled images of alleged police brutality.

They were responding to a Twitter request by the NYPD to offer up feel-good photos of people posing with police officers.

Experts questioned Wednesday how the NYPD didn’t anticipate the potential public relations debacle.

One said other large organizations have seen hashtags become “bashtags.”

 

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